GPUs with "Ti" versions are occasionally launched after the non-Ti variants. They're generally a tactic for AMD to stay competitive against new products it releases. In addition, they're frequently introduced to decrease GPU pricing without affecting previous GPUs' prices. This makes the new GPUs slightly more cost-effective and reduces a series' launch price.


The "Ti'' moniker is just a branding thing, so you're not going to find any performance differences between a non-Ti and Ti version of a GPU release. In some very exceptional cases though, Nvidia does tweak its AIB partner designs slightly. You may see extra power phases or heat sinks added for improved overclocking capabilities on the new cards. These tweaks are generally too small to have any real-world impact on performance but they can help out in some rare scenarios where high OCs aren't achievable by a non-Ti version of a card under certain thermal conditions/power delivery limitations that yield lower final results than what would be capable with better cooling.


Is Ti or SUPER better?


A common question with the release of new Nvidia GPUs is "What does Ti mean?" It's a branding thing, so you're not going to find any performance differences between a non-Ti and Ti version of a GPU. In some very exceptional cases though, Nvidia does tweak its AIB partner designs slightly. You may see extra power phases or heatsinks added for improved overclocking capabilities on the new cards. These tweaks are generally too small to have any real-world impact on performance but they can help out in some rare scenarios where high OCs aren't achievable by a non-Ti version of a card under certain thermal conditions/power delivery limitations that yield lower final results than what would be capable with better cooling.


Ti Vs. Non-Ti, What Does Ti Mean For Gaming?


When it comes to gaming, and there is an Nvidia Ti version released, that means you're going to be paying a little bit more money for the same level of performance. There's no real difference between them aside from one will cost you extra moolah and the other won't (generally). So, if you can afford it - get the Ti version; If not, make do with whatever your budget allows. This goes for pretty much everything else in life too btw - Why settle for less when you could have had more? Do you want a Ferrari or would a Ford Focus suit you better?


If money is no object, a Ti GPU will be the most beneficial purchase you've ever made. For the rest of us who build our PCs on a budget, lower-end Ti cards are more realistic components to aim for. Regardless of which one you select, keep in mind that with a Ti card on your side, FPS will undoubtedly increase.


Conclusion


The main point of this article is to make clear the distinction between non-Ti and Ti GPUs. Though they may seem otherwise, they are different. The only difference is in the price you pay for them -- nothing else. The speed, performance, cooling capabilities are all the same. You can thank AMD for that since it's a common practice among GPU manufacturers to launch "Ti" versions of every new release just so that there's something slightly better than their previous design to offer their customers as an incentive to buy new hardware over keeping what they have now longer.


If you're trying to decide whether or not you should purchase an Nvidia Ti version of any given graphics card, remember that there won't be any significant difference between the non-Ti and Ti versions, so don't go spending more money than you need to. They are almost the same thing! The only difference is in the price you pay for them -- nothing else. The speed, performance, cooling capabilities are all the same.