There are several different types of CPU sockets and they all support different CPUs. The most common type is the Socket 1150 which supports Intel i3,i5, and i7 CPUs as well as some Celeron and Pentium chips. The 1151 socket currently only supports the Skylake line of Intel CPUs (Intel i3,i5, and i7). There is also an older socket type called 775 which was used for the Intel Core 2 Duo and earlier CPUs.


The BGA socket is soldered to a computer system's motherboard. This is a Ball Grid Array, which is a type of socket that creates electrical signals on the motherboard. It has different versions for various motherboards. This socket type is also used as a PGA and LGA with the CPU.


Another option is the LGA and PGA sockets. These types of sockets can be found on some motherboards and they do not use a Socket. The CPU will come with copper pins that protrude from the bottom of its package and create electrical connections on the motherboard board. The motherboard has matching holes for these pins to make contact, as well as other components such as capacitors or resistors (for more info see Intel's explanation ).


Difference between LGA, PGA, BGA


LGA and PGA adaptors have pins on the connections that connect with pads on the CPU. PGA connections feature vertical slots on the connectors, which link to pins on the CPU. Because of BGA, a CPU is generally fastened directly to the board rather than to a replacement, which may be very expensive.


LGA and PGA connections are used for different CPUs. The CPU is mounted to the motherboard using a board, which has holes that line up with the pins of the CPU. The CPU itself does not have pins protruding from it like LGA and PGA, but instead, its pins will be soldered into these boards and then attached to the motherboard.
LGA sockets are on some CPUs made by Intel or AMD while they are sometimes on motherboards by other manufacturers. These sockets allow for more efficient heat dissipation on the chips because there are gaps between them that allow airflow between different components of the system. This also makes it easier to mount cooling solutions onto CPUs using this socket type since they do not have to be screwed on.


LGA and PGA sockets are used for different CPUs. The CPU is mounted to the motherboard using a board, which has holes that line up with the pins of the CPU. The CPU itself does not have pins protruding from it like LGA and PGA, but instead, its pins will be soldered into these boards and then attached to the motherboard.


When you buy a new PC, most likely it comes with its internal parts already assembled so there's no need for you to open it up again unless you want to replace an old peripheral or upgrade your system's storage capacity. If you plan on overclocking your processor, however, chances are high that it would require manual installation because this activity oftentimes involves removing the stock cooler to replace it with an aftermarket unit. How can you tell whether your processor is socketed or not?


The answer would be, look for a bunch of pins in your motherboard's central processing unit (CPU) slot. If there are no such pins, then it's likely that the motherboard only supports CPUs that have integrated heat spreaders and thus require a heatsink/fan assembly for cooling purposes. On the other hand, if you see a long row of pins on one side of your CPU slot, it means that this chipset is compatible with processors with separate units for cooling.